Cover of: Aristotle on the human good | Richard Kraut

Aristotle on the human good

  • 379 Pages
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Princeton University Press , Princeton, N.J
Aristotle, Aristotle -- Ethics, Good and evil -- History, Happiness -- Hi
StatementRichard Kraut.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB430 .K73 1989
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 379 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2209976M
ISBN 10069107349X
LC Control Number89032443

Aristotle on the Human Good.

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Richard Kraut. Overview. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness (eudaimonia), is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods.

Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness (eudaimonia), is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods. Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational soul/5(6).

In defense of this reading, Kraut discusses Aristotle's attempt to organize all human goods into a single structure, so that each subordinate end is desirable for the sake of some higher goal. This. Book 1: The highest human good Aristotle has a teleological theory of nature in general and of human nature in particular.

Teleology is end-directedness, goal-directedness, or purposiveness, and therefore to say that something, some process, or some act is teleological is just to say that it has some end, goal, or purpose. Aristotle on the Human Good.

Kraut, R. Aristotle on the Human Good. Princeton: Princeton U. Press, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness (eudaimonia), it is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods.

Richard Kraut Proposes instead that Aristotle identifies. In BookAristotle argues that we can discover the “human good” (our distinctive happiness) if we can determine the characteristic natural function of human beings.

Aristotle on the human good book does he determine our function. Which options does he rule out, and why. Prompt: Explain Aristotle’s discussion of the “function of a human being” in Book 1 Chapter 7 relates to his view that the virtues are means between extremes.

To start off the discussion, one must take into account that “the function of man is an activity of soul which follows or implies a rational principle” (Book.

Richard Kraut has written several excellent books. I could have chosen his Aristotle Aristotle on the human good book the Human Good () but my favourite of all his books is Aristotle: Political Philosophy (). Kraut is personally committed to public engagement, so he writes with unusual clarity.

He says that he wants to write for newcomers to Aristotle. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness (eudaimonia), is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods.

Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational by:   [Aristotle says that political science is the science which studies the good for humans.] This leads us to Aristotle’s conception of government and society.

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In brief, Aristotle believed that societies can only survive and flourish if there is some basic agreement about issues of private morality. In the quest to find out what is the ultimate human good, Aristotle dedicated Book 1 of the Nicomachean Ethics to provide an account of what is the ultimate human good, and what it consists of.

This essay will examine why Aristotle thinks that eudaimonia (happiness), is the ultimate human good. Through this discussion, we will see Aristotle suggest four central views which are critical to. Now we are ready to begin the main argument of Book I: the attempt to discover the good for human beings.

Aristotle first notes in chapter 4 that almost all would agree on giving it a certain name. That name is eudaimonia—literally, “being blessed with a good daimon.” The book. In defense of this reading, Kraut discusses Aristotle's attempt to organize all human goods into a single structure, so that each subordinate end is desirable for the sake of some higher goal.

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This book also emphasizes the philosopher's hierarchy of natural kinds, in which every type of creature achieves its good by imitating divine life. In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle argues that the end is only good when pursued in moderation.

The city-state, therefore, is the end and perfection of natural associations. Aristotle reveals. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics: Best Good In the Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle writes, “perhaps we shall find the best good if we first find the function of a human being” (b25).

For Aristotle, this “best good” is the only purely non-instrumental good, happiness. He believes that for. When he makes the best of the leather he has available, and makes a good shoe. But what of human beings in general. When is man good. What is a good human. If this worked the same way, we’d need to know what the purpose of a human was, so that we could see if a human fulfills this purpose well.

For Aristotle, everything has a purpose. Humans too. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness, is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods.

Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational by: The highest human good is the same as good human functioning, and good human functioning is the same as the good exercise of the faculty of reason—that is to say, the activity of rational soul in accordance with virtue.

Plato, Aristotle and many others promised to teach their students how to lead lives that were happy, in accordance with human nature, and, above all, lives that were good. Aristotle describes three different kinds of lives in Nicomachean Ethics.

These three lives consists of the life of honor, the life of pleasure, and the life of study. Aristotle, from the first book, insists that the life of study or contemplation is considered to be the best life.

He. pleasures are good in moderation – we are embodied creatures, and too little appreciation of bodily pleasures can Aristotle and the Good Life Antonia Macaro Eudaimonia is addressed in books I and X of the Nicomachean Ethics.

Additionally, pleasure is discussed in book VII and relationships in books. In the first book of Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle argues for what he thinks the function of human beings is and for what the human good or flourishing (eudaimonia) consists in.

Herein, I will present a formulation of the argument and then offer two reasons why I think it is argument may be stated as follows: (1) The function F of X is determined by identifying X’s unique and.

Prez 3 Arnaldo Prez Professor Marshall PHI 22 February, Highest Human Good, according to Aristotle Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle, thought that the highest human good is virtue, which he straightly defines “as a state of character”.

A meaningful life according to him, should be able to fulfill our rational function as human beings. [ ]. Kraut, Richard./ Aristotle on the Human Good: An tle's Ethics: Critical Essays.

editor / Nancy Sherman. Rowman & Littlefield, is a platform for academics to share research papers. In book one of The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle discusses that virtue is the highest human good.

This being said, there are two qualifications that the highest good must have, “The good must be something final and self-sufficient,” (Aristotle, 10).

On happiness: In his treatises on ethics, Aristotle aimed to discover the best way to live life and give it meaning — “the supreme good for man,” in his words — which he determined was the.

Introduction. The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's most important study of personal morality and the ends of human life, has for many centuries been a widely-read and influential written more than 2, years ago, it offers the modern reader many valuable insights into human needs and conduct.

Among its most outstanding features are Aristotle's insistence that there are no known. - Aristotle maintains that human beings, as human beings, do have some sort of function that they all share, even if most human beings don't actually realize it.

What is this function and how does he think we develop or perform it. Do you agree with his view on this matter. Why or what not. Summary There is an old saying that we should call no man happy as long as he is alive. This is a paradox because it implies that a man can be happy after he is.

book 1 book 2 book 3 book 4 book 5 book 6 book 7 book 8 book 9 book chapter: the more or less reasoned conceptions of the Good or Happiness that seem to prevail are the following. Aristotle in 23 Volumes, Vol. 19, translated by H.

Rackham. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. In particular, he talks about living well as performing the function of “being human” well, analogous to the good flutist performing the function of playing the flute well.

It may seem that Aristotle has confused the practical and the moral: being a good flutist is a practical matter of study and talent, while no such analogy holds for.Aristotle (/ ær ɪ s ˈ t ɒ t əl /; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; – BC) was a Greek philosopher and polymath during the Classical period in Ancient by Plato, he was the founder of the Lyceum, the Peripatetic school of philosophy, and the Aristotelian tradition.

His writings cover many subjects including physics, biology Era: Ancient Greek philosophy.